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In the Pages of Sea History 160

Sea History 160 is in the mail and on the newsstands. Just look at what’s in this issue:

Austin Dwyer

Collision in the Narrows: the 1917 Halifax Harbor Explosion, by Roger Marsters
The most powerful man-made explosion before the Atomic Age came with little warning on a cold December morning in Halifax, Nova Scotia, when a collision between two cargo ships in the harbor set off a catastrophic chain reaction, catching all in its radius in its devastating blast.

To Boldly Go…” NASA Astronauts Taking the Lessons of Sail Training into Space, by Bert Rogers, with Mark Scibinico
The link between ocean voyaging and space exploration might be closer than you think. NASA astronauts find the lessons from sail training aboard the 1877 barque Elissa valuable in their preparations for space flight.

Arader Gallery

A New Look at Nathaniel Bowditch, Nineteenth-Century America’s Numbers Man, by Tamara Plakins Thornton
Mariners know his name from their well-used navigational “ bible,” The New American Practical Navigator, but Nathaniel Bowditch’s obsession with numbers and order left a legacy in other fields few would realize came from his work.

The 2017 National Maritime Historical Society Annual Awards Dinner, by Julia Church
NMHS will recognize three deserving members of the maritime heritage community this fall. Here’s a sneak peek at the gala celebration.

State Historical Society of Wisconsin

Probing the Mysteries of the Jones Act: Part 2, by Michael J. Rauworth
Mike Rauworth breaks down the origins and modern-day ramifications of the Merchant Marine Act of 1920 in this second installment of a two-part series on the Jones Act.

On WatchSS United States Engineer Bob Sturm Still Serving the “Big U,” by Bill Bleyer
More than a half a century after he signed off as a junior engineer aboard the famed ocean liner SS United States, Bob Sturm returns to serve his old ship—this time in the archives.

US Coast Guard Collection

Coast Guardsman Robert Goldman, and the Kamikaze Attack on LST-66, by William H. Thiesen
After a Japanese Zero fighter attacked their ship, a burned and badly injured pharmacist’s mate rushed across the burning deck to the aid of his wounded shipmates. Learn about the heroics of this young Coast Guardsman and his dedication and sacrifice for his shipmates, his ship, and his nation.

National History Day Prizes in Maritime History, Sponsored by NMHS
More than half a million students participated in National History Day competitions this year. NMHS encourages students to pursue topics in maritime history and recognizes outstanding projects in state competitions. Learn more about NHD and this year’s award winners.

Plus, you’ll find the regular features you look forward to in every issue:

Deck Log
Letters
NMHS: A Cause in Motion
Marine Art News
Sea History for Kids
Ship Notes, Seaport & Museum News
Calendar
Maritime History on the Internet
Book Reviews

On our cover this issue: Diamond Jubilee, by Robert Semler.

Click here to learn more about Sea History magazine.

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In the Pages of Sea History 159

Sea History 159 is in the mail and on the newsstands. Just look at what’s in this issue:

At War Before the War—SS City of Flint’s Ordeal Under the Nazi Flag, by Dr. Donald E. Willett
In 1939, before the US joined WWII, the crew of SS City of Flint learned just how dangerous their jobs had become when their ship was stopped at sea and seized by a Nazi warship.

Probing the Mysteries of the Jones Act: Part 1, by Michael J. Rauworth
The Merchant Marine Act of 1920 is misunderstood even by those whose livelihoods it directly affects. Is it workers’ compensation? Cabotage restrictions? Maritime attorney and master mariner Mike Rauworth takes a look at the Jones Act in a two-part series, explaining what it means and why it matters.

Copper Bottomed—USS Constitution Restoration 2015–17, by Margherita M. Desy and Kate Monea
While USS Constitution is still in dry dock at the end of a three-year restoration effort, visitors can’t help but notice the bright copper plating tacked to the ship’s hull below the waterline. The practice is as old as the 1797 ship for protecting a wooden hull from damaging marine growth.

Tall Ships America: Maritime Heritage Calls On Boston this Summer, by Bert Rogers and Harold Burnham
Tall ships are coming to Boston! As you take in the fantastic spectacle of towering masts and billowing canvas, also appreciate the small fleet of Essex-built schooners dating from 1893 to 2011. These vessels, representing a centuries-old shipbuilding heritage, will be on hand for tours and sailing from Fan Pier.

Apprentice-Built Dories for Schooner Adventure, by Stefan Edick and Graham McKay
With her restoration completed, schooner Adventure is getting the last piece of her deck equipment delivered this summer—her iconic stacked dories. Built by teenaged apprentices at Lowell’s Boat Shop, these boats are authentically designed and built, making Adventure’s story not just about the big schooner, but about the artisans that equipped and maintained the fishing fleet.

One Last Ocean Crossing: The 1911 Barque Peking Returns to Germany,
by Gregory DL Morris
This summer, the barque Peking sails home to Germany—in a massive heavy-lift dock ship—to be restored and take center stage as the flagship of a new German maritime heritage center.

Plus, you’ll find the regular features you look forward to in every issue:

Deck Log
Letters
NMHS: A Cause in Motion
Marine Art News
Sea History for Kids
Ship Notes, Seaport & Museum News
Calendar
Maritime History on the Internet
Book Reviews

On our cover this issue: photo by George Bekris.

Click here to learn more about Sea History magazine.

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In the Pages of Sea History 158


Sea History
158 is in the mail and on the newsstands. Just look at what’s in this issue:

USCG photo by PA1 Kurt Fredrickson

Storis’s Legacy: How a Decommissioned Ship Inspired a Movement, by K. Denise Rucker Krepp
The fate of the historic Coast Guard Cutter Storis, scrapped overseas despite a bid from a museum group to offer her a new home, serves as a cautionary tale for us and for our fellow advocates to ensure that future vessels are again recycled responsibly in the US, with the proceeds funding vital maritime heritage programs.

Restored! America’s Maritime Heritage Grant Program, by Timothy J. Runyan
With the passage of the National Defense Authorization Act last December, full funding for the Maritime Heritage Grants program has been restored, after a seven-year battle. Dr. Tim Runyan, chair of the National Maritime Alliance, explains the process and who supported it.

Confederate Submarine H. L. Hunley: First in History to Sink an Enemy Ship in Wartime, by Mark K. Ragan
Designing and fabricating an underwater vessel for naval warfare in the mid 19th century presented a host of challenges, and lives were lost in its development. The historic Confederate submarine H. L. Hunley, the result of this remarkable project led by three men of vision, was recovered in 2000, a technological marvel of its time.

The America’s Cup: Personalities, Passion, and Privilege, by Russ Kramer
Reaching back to 1851, the history of this most famous of sailing regattas is replete with larger-than-life personalities, big money, and fantastic yachts. Artist Russ Kramer recreates the scenes and faces of this history in this exciting curated collection.

Tidal Wave: The Greatest Ship Launch in History, by Donald G. Shomette
Tucked in a bay off the Potomac River is a ship graveyard like no other. More than half of the 200 ships abandoned there were products of the great shipbuilding effort of World War I. Today, the site has been nominated as a National Marine Sanctuary. Don Shomette brings the story of the mad-paced launch schedule in 1918 that created a “tidal wave of ships.”

National Maritime Awards Dinner, and the 2017 NMHS Annual Meeting
We hope you will join us for two exciting events: April’s annual National Maritime Awards Dinner in the nation’s capital and our Annual Meeting in May, in historic Charleston, SC.

Coastal Defenses—Strategies and Innovation in Peace and War, by Dr. Louis A. Norton
Coastal towns, cities, and countries have used a variety of means to protect themselves from hostile forces on the water, from utilizing a site’s natural physical geography to inventing clever—and deadly—fortifications and weaponry. Dr. Louis Norton traces some of the more successful and innovative of these defenses.

Plus, you’ll find the regular features you look forward to in every issue:

Deck Log
Letters
NMHS: A Cause in Motion
Marine Art News
Sea History for Kids
Ship Notes, Seaport & Museum News
Calendar
Maritime History on the Internet
Book Reviews

On our cover this issue: Onboard Puritan, 1885, by Russ Kramer, oil on canvas, 30 x 40 inches.

Click here to learn more about Sea History magazine.

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In the Pages of Sea History 157

Sea History 157 is in the mail and on the newsstands. Just look at what’s in this issue:

Cutterman Frank Newcomb and the Rescue of USS Winslow, by William H. Thiesen
When the United States declared war on Spain in the spring of 1898, US Revenue Cutter Service Lt. Frank Newcomb, in command of USRC Hudson out of New York, was sent to patrol the north coast of Cuba. Not long after their arrival, Newcomb and his crew led a daring rescue of a disabled US Navy torpedo boat, under attack during the Battle of Cárdenas.

Lieutenant Charles Hunter, USN, and the Blanche Affair, by Evelyn M. Cherpak
In the days before wireless communications, naval captains had to use their best judgment to assess a potential enemy at sea without the benefit of verifying their planned course of action with their superiors. In the Civil War, US Navy lieutenant Charles Hunter considered it within his authority to stop ships at sea and seize them. The ramifications were deemed controversial and demonstrate the difficult gray area lesser commanders had to navigate.

Welcome to the New Land, Draken Harald Hårfagre, by Ingeborg Louise “Vesla” Adie
In 2016, the largest Viking ship built in modern times sailed to North America and toured the Great Lakes and the northeast, inspiring Norwegian-Americans to learn more about their proud Viking heritage and share it with the world.
Find this article in Featured Articles from Sea History.

The Rivers: A Celebration of Life and Work on America’s Waterways, by Daven Anderson
Each year, more than 500 million tons of freight flow past American cities and towns along our inland waterways, mostly out of the public eye. Artist Daven Anderson’s latest exhibition looks at the working craft and culture on our inland rivers, in all their grit and beauty.
Online exclusive: see more of Daven Anderson’s works here.

Funding for America’s Maritime Heritage: Rounding the Bases, by Timothy J. Runyan
While funding established by the Maritime Heritage Act of 1994 was reinstated a few years ago, the full amount promised has yet to be made available. National Maritime Alliance Chair, Dr. Timothy Runyan, has kept the pressure on Congress to restore full funding to the grants program, and he can’t do it alone. In this update, Dr. Runyan explains how we can help.
Update:

The Barque Picton Castle Bosun School: Learning the Traditional Skills of the Sailing Ship Seafarer, by Captain Daniel D. Moreland
While the Age of Sail in its true form has long passed and, with it, the everyday knowledge and skills of the mariner and rigger, there is still one place where one can go to learn the ways of a ship from a master, without committing to a long term at sea.

 

 

Plus, you’ll find the regular features you look forward to in every issue:

Deck Log
Letters
NMHS: A Cause in Motion
Marine Art News
Sea History for Kids
Ship Notes, Seaport & Museum News
Calendar
Maritime History on the Internet
Book Reviews

On our cover this issue: Morning Mist, Lower Mississippi River Mile Post 174 by Daven Anderson, Watercolor and Mixed Media on Paper, 20 x 26.5 inches.

Click here to learn more about Sea History magazine.

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In the Pages of Sea History 155

Sea History 155 is in the mail and on the newsstands. Just look at what’s in this issue:

 

ToC PST Fair Winds, Peter (1927–2016), by Shelley Reid
The National Maritime Historical Society and the maritime heritage community at large remember our president emeritus and long-time editor of Sea History, Peter Stanford.
Find this article in Featured Articles from Sea History

The Cape Horn Road, Part II: How the Sails of the Square-rigged Ship Got their Names, by Peter Stanford
From 1994 to 2000, Peter Stanford captivated readers with tales of The Cape Horn Road, his 22-installment series about the sweeping history of seafaring. In installment II, reprinted here in honor of his countless contributions to Sea History, Peter discusses the story of how square sails were named, drawing inspiration from Wavertree, the ship Peter and Norma Stanford rescued from retirement as a sand barge to become the flagship of the South Street Seaport Museum.

Wavertree Restoration: News from the Shipyard, by Jonathan Boulware
South Street Seaport Museum’s executive director updates us on Wavertree’s progress, as the 1885 iron-hulled full rigged ship’s $13-million restoration continues.

TRAVELER DIGITAL CAMERA

TRAVELER DIGITAL CAMERA

So Close to Home: U-boats in the Gulf of Mexico, by Michael J. Tougias
Not many Americans realize how close German U-boats came to their shores. Best-selling author Michael Tougias puts us on board U-507 with Commander Harro Schacht as he sneaks into the Gulf of Mexico in the spring of 1942 and wreaks havoc on American shipping.

Congress Supports Maritime Heritage Amendments! by Dr. Timothy J. Runyan
The National Parks Service has announced the recipients of the 2015 Maritime Heritage Grants cycle, and the National Maritime Historical Society is on the list! The National Maritime Alliance’s Tim Runyan reports on the progress on Capitol Hill of efforts to restore more funding to the program, and outlines what you, our readers, can do to help.

ToC CudahyHell With the Lid Off!—Lt. Hobson and the Sinking of the Merrimac at Santiago, Cuba, 1898, by Patrick S. Grant
Faced with the task of keeping the Spanish fleet trapped in Santiago Harbor, Lt. Richmond Hobson, a naval constructor, and a crew of volunteers from the US fleet embarked on a risky mission to block the narrow channel by sinking their own ship.

 

ToC BowdoinBound for the Arctic and Beyond: Schooner Bowdoin Prepares for Her Second Century of Voyaging, by Michael W. Mahan
Designed to sail through the ice packs of the Arctic, the solidly built schooner Bowdoin, now a training ship for the Maine Maritime Academy, is being restored as she approaches her 100th birthday.

This issue’s cover: Wavertree at Caddell Dry Dock.

Plus, you’ll find the regular features you look forward to in every issue:

Deck Log
Letters
NMHS: A Cause in Motion
Marine Art News
Sea History for Kids
Ship Notes, Seaport & Museum News
Calendar
Maritime History on the Internet
Book Reviews

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In the Pages of Sea History 154

Sea History 154 is in the mail and on the newsstands. Just look at what’s in this issue:

The 2016 National Maritime Awards Dinner
NMHS and the Naval Historical Foundation present the 2016 National Maritime Awards Dinner. Join us for our annual gala event at the National Press Club in Washington, DC!

ICMM in Hong Kong, the 2015 International Congress of Maritime Museums,
by Burchenal Green and Deirdre O’Regan
For the first time in its history, the ICMM held its biennial conference in Asia this past November, where attendees from institutions around the world, large and small, had a unique opportunity to network, debate, support, and encourage best practices for the maritime museum community.

Photo: Marion Kaplan

Photo: Marion Kaplan

So Old a Ship: Twilight of the Arab Dhow, by Marion Kaplan
In 1974, photojournalist Marion Kaplan embarked on an expedition to document the last generation of Arab dhows, sailing with the monsoon along ancient trading routes. Here, she shares glimpses of that journey, and of the way of life of the dhow captains and crews.
Find this article in Featured Articles from Sea History

Racing the Goldplaters—the Tradition Continues, by John C. North II
Summer visitors to Maryland’s Eastern Shore are treated to a spectacle of athleticism, tradition, history, and good fun at the annual Chesapeake Bay log canoe races. There is a history to the evolution of these remarkable vessels that have sailed and raced for more than 100 years.

Courtesy Cal Maritime Academy

Courtesy Cal Maritime Academy

We Know Ocean! Improving Ocean Literacy at Cal Maritime,
by Colin Dewey, Alexander Parker, Steven Runyon
Recognizing the critical link between the health of the oceans and the survival of our planet, California Maritime Academy is taking the lead in improving ocean literacy among our future professional master mariners and leaders shaping environmental and economic policy.

Historic Ships on a Lee Shore: Kit Jones is Waiting for You, by William C. Fleetwood Jr.

Kit Jones tumblr 1973

University of Mississippi

Leisure yacht of the rich and famous, wartime fireboat, and scientific research vessel—the 1939 Sparkman & Stephens designed Kit Jones has had a remarkable career. Currently, she sits abandoned in a Biloxi boatyard, awaiting her next reincarnation.

The Brothers Eldridge: Extraordinary Mariners in an Extraordinary Age,
by Vincent Miles
Nineteenth-century ship captains faced professional obsolescence with the transition from sail to steam, a new technology that required the skills of an engineer over the expertise of the sailing master. Three brothers from Cape Cod, however, prevailed, becoming elite ship masters of both.

 

This issue’s cover is  The Wait/Flying Cloud, by Marc Castelli.

Plus, you’ll find the regular features you look forward to in every issue:

Deck Log
Letters
NMHS: A Cause in Motion
Marine Art News
Sea History for Kids
Ship Notes, Seaport & Museum News
Calendar
Maritime History on the Internet
Book Reviews

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In the Pages of Sea History 153

Sea History 153 is in the mail and on the newsstands. Just look at what’s in this issue:

National Teacher Joseph Hughes & Matthew Blount iHistory Day—Prizes in Maritime History
Meet the winners of this year’s NMHS maritime history competition, part of the National History Day program. More than half a million middle and high school students take part in the NHD research-project competition.

Cutterman Hugh George Campbell: Master and Commander of Super-Cutter Eagle and Forgotten Hero of the Quasi War, by William H. Thiesen
Hugh Campbell served his country in four naval wars as a patriot, cutterman, combat captain, and senior naval officer. In a two-year campaign in the West Indies during the Quasi War, Campbell and his crew captured twenty-two privateers, prize ships, and enemy merchantmen, while destroying a number of others. All this was achieved without losing a single member of his crew.

H4 NMMA New Look at the Longitude Problem,” by Daniel McFadden
The exhibition Ships, Clocks, and Stars: The Quest for Longitude, produced by the National Maritime Museum in London, takes into consideration the many angles and players who were working on solving the great challenge of their time. For a limited time, the exhibition is on display at Mystic Seaport, offering the chance to see Harrison’s famous sea clocks up close.

Trade vs. Diplomacy: The Problem of the Free Port Marstrand During the American Revolution, by Rikard Drakenlordh
During the War for Independence, American shipowners sought to establish trading partners around the world, both for economic interests and to supply the fighting forces at home with much-needed supplies. Great Britain tried to quash this attempt. Caught in the middle were neutral nations trying to establish free ports.

Dr. Robert Ballard watches the bow of the Titanic 6/4 come into view on plasma screens in the control van, as the ROV Hercules photographs the shipreck on HD cameras 12,500 feet below. NOAA oceanographer Catalina Martinez sits to his left. She is part of the ocean exploration program, which supported the expedition by providing the NOAA research vessel Ronald H. Brown.

Maritime Archaeology in the 21st Century, by James P. Delgado
Advances in technology, awareness, and education, and a shift in how both academia and the diving community view shipwrecks, have driven the field of maritime archaeology into a new era. James Delgado, director of NOAA’s Maritime Heritage Program, traces the evolution of the field from its beginnings to how maritime archaeology is practiced today.
Find this article in Featured Articles from Sea History

Sailors in Distress: The Origins of the First Federal Healthcare Legislation, by Harold D. Langley

V0020360 Two sailors with amputated legs, an eyepatch and an amputate Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org Two sailors with amputated legs, an eyepatch and an amputated arm moving with the aid of crutches. Etching by S.B., 1783. 1783 By: S. B.after: Edward YoungPublished: 20 September 1783 Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Wellcome Library, London. http://wellcomeimages.org

One of the first orders of business for the First Federal Congress when it met in 1789 was to address who would pay for the care of stranded American seamen in foreign ports and sick and disabled seamen who arrived in American ports with no one to take them in.

 

 

This issue’s cover is  Eagle and Constitution on Convoy Duty, April 1799, digital painting by Peter Rindlisbacher.

 

Plus, you’ll find the regular features you look forward to in every issue:

Deck Log
Letters
NMHS: A Cause in Motion
Marine Art News
Sea History for Kids
Ship Notes, Seaport & Museum News
Calendar
Maritime History on the Internet
Book Reviews

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Join NMHS for A Dream of Tall Ships with Authors Peter and Norma Stanford

Join the National Maritime Historical Society for
A Dream of Tall Ships
with Authors Peter and Norma Stanford

Friday, 20 February 2015 at 5 pm
Antipodean Books, Maps & Prints, 29 Garrison Landing, Garrison, NY 10524

Please join us on Friday 20 February from 5-8 pm for a talk and book signing with Peter and Norma Stanford, authors of A Dream of Tall Ships: How New Yorkers came together to save the city’s sailing-ship waterfront.  Refreshments will be served.

ADOTSforprintA Dream of Tall Ships is the lively account of a great urban adventure beginning in the 1960s with two New Yorkers committed to creating a maritime museum in Manhattan’s old sailing-ship waterfront – the South Street Seaport Museum. Entranced by the old brick buildings of the Fulton Fish Market neighborhood and aware of the rush of new office-building construction in Lower Manhattan, they moved to save the old buildings as a historic district, and breathe new life into New York’s old Street of Ships.

The idea of recreating the old sailing-ship waterfront inspired young and old, rich and poor, Wall Streeters and blue-collar workers, seamen, firemen, policemen and teachers to work together to found a museum showcasing the streets and ships that built the port, which built the city, which built the nation.

Peter Stanford was a founder and first president of South Street Seaport in New York and co-founder of the National Maritime Historical Society. Under his leadership, the Society began publishing the distinguished quarterly magazine Sea History. Other NMHS publications included such works as the International Register of Historic ShipsThe Peking Battles Cape Horn, and The Skipper and the Eagle.

To register, please call (914) 456-9698 or email nmhs@seahistory.org.
We look forward to seeing you there!

 

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