VESSELS

 

Hauling a Ship Over the Mountains of New England

In 1776, during the Revolutionary War, General Carleton of the British military needed ships to fight the American gunboats on Lake Champlain. British soldiers in Canada dismantled HMS Inflexible and two smaller ships Maria and Carleton and carried them in sections through the forests.

It took the British months to build and transport the ships, but just 28 days to reassemble them. Carleton and his soldiers launched the ships on the shore of Lake Champlain just in time to fight the battle of Valcour Island against a small fleet of American gunboats in October 1776. This was the first time that American forces fought a British fleet.


Image: October 11, 1776 the Battle of Valcour Island.

Did You Know?

Lebreton Engraving

Today, shipyards have a number of ways to get a ship out of water, either by hauling it out or by floating it into a basin and the water pumped out.

Historically though, sea captains would careen their vessels in shallow water by either heaving it over on its side while it was still afloat or by anchoring in shallow water at high tide and then waiting for the tide to go out. The vessel would touch bottom, and, as the tide went out, lay over on its side.

How does one go about getting a ship, especially a big ship, high and dry out of the water today?

Learn more at A Ship Out of Water